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Adaptive Path is Growing

Adaptive Path is growing! As some of you may know, AP recently opened a new branch in Austin, TX. This summer, I got the chance to work in both the San Francisco and Austin offices, and it was definitely a unique experience.

To set the stage, I spent alternate weeks in the two cities for the span of one month. Although it was exciting to get a taste of two cities for the price of one, there were definitely some challenges. Iíve put together some tips that wouldíve made my experience a little bit better (not that it was bad to begin with), and hopefully, will help you in the future too.

1. Keep an open line of communication


Try to talk to each other via phone, email, twitter (any means necessary) everyday to keep both sides updated. There is nothing more frustrating than not being involved in making the big decisions that will either make or break your project. For me, I had to work remotely with my team during the analysis phase of the project, and because I did not try to communicate with them pro-actively everyday, I found myself struggling to understand their insights.

2. Donít become an island


Itís easy to feel like an outsider on both sides when you are straddling two offices. Donít be too sensitive when you are not let-in on the inside joke that is being passed around in a meeting. Check emails frequently and chime in on conversations that interest you. Though you might not be there, itís important to let both sides know that you are listening and thinking intently.

3. Be an ambassador


In this age of rampant pinging and emailing, we often forget how important it is to get to know a person, well, in person. Take advantage of the fact that you have first hand experience in interacting with both offices. Leverage that information in an effort to bring the two offices closer. Share something that you have heard in a meeting that might be of interest to the other office, speak on behalf of the other team when they canít attend video conferences, etc, etc.

4. Do something together


Whether itís running a Rockband competition or a Wii Olympics, try to facilitate events that will help bring the two offices closer. After all, an office that plays together sticks together.

5. Go out with your co-workers!


While this one might seem a no-brainer, youíll be surprised at how often itís ignored. Since I had half the time to get to know double the number of people, plus the commute back and forth, it became a lot harder for me to have the energy to attend non-work related activities with my colleagues. But I really, really wished that I had. Just like the Rockband competition, you will find out so much more about a person over a pint of great beer. And remember those inside jokes? If I had hang out with people more, I couldíve created my own!

6. Set up foldershare


This is not a plug for foldershare! But it did work really well in my experience. This goes along with the Tip #1. Having access to the same files will save you transfer time. Especially crucial when people are working in different locations.

7. BATS!


Okay, this is not really a tip but I just wanted to say that I saw swarms of bats fly out from under the Congress Bridge in Austin. They were way cool.


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